Dharma Wheel or Wheel of Dharma Lama Lodro, Yukon, Canada
May All Beings be Well and Happy and Guide Themselves to Liberation

Meditation Library

How Meditation Can Help YOU

The secrets to your true happiness, good health, and full potential are inside your own being.   To get that information, you need to temporarily put aside the distractions of our busy world and seek the profound wisdom that is deep within you.

Meditation is a process of using tools of mental cultivation to access and explore the cosmic truths within your being.   The Buddha said, "I will show you the rising and the passing of the universe in this fathom-long body".   He was talking about you.

Wherever you go, there you are.   If you want a change, try changing the nature of your mind.   When the nature of your mind changes, your whole world changes.

Buddhist theory is that we were all born to be Buddhas.   Buddha-nature is the true foundation of our being.  You can use meditation to find, access, and awaken the pure illuminated clarity, wisdom, and happiness that is your ultimate nature and your ultimate treasure.

Find out for yourself if you were born to be a Buddha.   Meditation is a skill that can be learnt like any other skill.   You don't need to join a group or be religious to meditate. Meditation is ultimately a personal journey of inner exploration and discovery.

There is a meditation option somewhere for everyone. For anyone who doesn't want to re-invent the meditation wheel, there are hundreds of different lineages and thousands of tools of mental cultivation just within Buddhism. Most religions have a contemplative aspect that includes some form of meditation. And religion is just one type of contemplative path; there are many others.

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Tools of Mental Cultivation

If you need software to open the PDF documents on this page, try this: Adobe Reader


These are some of the tools of mental cultivation personally used by Lama Lodro for his meditations.  His path, however, has been very unusual, so other meditation tools from other contemplative paths may be more congenial to some people.

Non-religious, non-denominational, useful for any meditator:

Theravada Buddhism and Vipassana:

Sadhana Texts of Buddhist Wongkur Ceremonies
for Sahaja-Tantra and Vajrayana Empowerments

The wongkur sadhana texts below were developed, researched, compiled, revised, crafted, and edited by Lama Lodro and Chrys Antaya. These documents are part of a volunteer project we started in 2012 to provide valuable, historical meditation tools in modern language while maintaining the authenticity and integrity of the original teachings. Our sadhana texts have large fonts to assist those with viewing and reading challenges. Within the context of accessibility, the layout of the sadhanas is designed to save paper and preserve trees.

These wongkur sadhana texts are living documents and continue to evolve and grow as our meditation work and research with each sadhana continues. The date of the latest update is in the file name and on the numbered pages of each sadhana.

The wongkur sadhana texts are high resolution for high quality on-screen viewing and printing {thus worth the extra minute of download time}.

We share these wongkur sadhana documents with other meditators who are on this path of meditation teaching, and we dedicate the merit of this project to the great meditation teachers who have been of such benefit to us and other beings.

These documents are only part of the content in Wongkur ceremonies. Additional teaching, plus the energy blessings, are bestowed by the Lama during the ceremony.


This Medicine Buddha sadhana can be shared with meditators who have NOT attended a Medicine Buddha Wongkur NOR any other Empowerment Initiation.  It is also a detailed resource for meditators who have attended a Medicine Buddha Wongkur.

The sadhana texts below are meditation and contemplation resources for meditators who attend the Wongkur Empowerment Initiation ceremonies conducted by a Lama.  


Individual Portrait Images of Tantric Wisdom-beings ("Deity-Yidams")
for Meditation Shrines and Wongkur Ceremonies

These individual "Deity" images are the same iconographically correct, high quality images on the covers of Lama Lodro's Sadhana texts for Wongkur ceremonies. The decorative borders are inspired by the traditional red, yellow, blue tri-colour fabric frames of Tibetan Buddhist thankga paintings. Added to the design is a triplet of the Eight Auspicious Symbols of Buddhism, also known as the Eight Good Luck Symbols.

These high resolution images range from 600ppi to 1000ppi and are formatted for 11x14 inches (a standard size for photographic prints and picture frames). This means large graphics files, but the picture quality is really worth the extra download time. The 11x14 ratio also scales down (within reasonable margins) to very high definition 8.5x11 inch prints.

One of the sources of "Deity" images used for our sadhana covers and shrine images is the website of Tsem Tulku Rinpoche, which provides free downloads of good quality, iconographically correct images of Buddhas and Boddhisattvas. In some cases, to match the iconography more precisely to Lama Lodro's sadhana texts, specialized customization was done to the downloaded images with due respect for the nature, purpose, and artistry of the original image.

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Interesting Ideas and Public Talks

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Transcripts from interesting Public Talks by Lama Karma Tsundulp Lodro


Great Summary (clear, easy, straightforward) about the Buddha, Buddhism,
the Four Noble Truths, and the Noble Eightfold Path of Spiritual Liberation.

~ PDF document for download.

Spiritual Aspects of Buddhist-Ayurvedic, Traditional Chinese, and Western Medical Systems:

~ PDF document for download.
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Glossary of Definitions and Descriptions
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Anapana-sati   (Mindfulness on In-and-Out-Breathing)
Focused meditation in which the meditator concentrates attention on the natural and uncontrolled movement of the breath. Regular practice of Ananpana-sati can reduce mental dullness, increase clarity, enhance cognition, and improve memory.
Anapana-sati is one of the classic techniques of Satipatthãna. In the Satipatthãna Sutta, the Buddha said: This is the direct path for the purification of beings, for the down-going of grief and suffering, for the realization of the Inner Peace and Great Bliss that is Nibbana (Nirvana).
Bhrama Viharas (Divine Abodes)
Bhrama Viharas are a body of pre-Buddhist teachings adopted and adapted by Buddha Siddhartha Gautama. They are carefully crafted to produce and strengthen the Divine Abodes within a person of Friendly Kindness, Compassion, Sympathetic Joy, and Equanimity.
The cultivation of these four wholesome mind states increases happiness and helps develop the strength and inner support for depth insight and liberation from ignorance and suffering.
Buddha   ("The" Buddha, Gautama Buddha)
The Buddha is not a god. He was a prince named Siddhartha Gautama born approximately 2,500 years ago. He was heir to the throne of an ancient Shakya kingdom in present day Nepal.
At about the age of 30, Crown Prince Gautama voluntarily walked away from the comfort of his family and the privileges of his kingdom. Instead, he chose a deeply spiritual life and lived as a wandering ascetic monk with no possessions until his death at the age of 84.
Gautama developed a humane spiritual teaching of great compassion based on human nature and human potential. Known as the "Middle Way", Buddha Gautama's teaching is a balanced path of uncommon "common sense".
Gautama never called himself a "Buddha", which means "awakened" or "illuminated". Gautama said that we are all born to be Buddhas. But people of his time gave Gautama the title of "Buddha" as an accolade in appreciation for his insights, integrity, and remarkable attainments.
Buddha Siddhartha Gautama's main spiritual teachings are summed up in his Four Noble Truths and his path to inner freedom, the Noble Eightfold Path.

Download Great Info (clear, easy, straightforward) about the Buddha :
Noble Truths & Illumination - Jewel Essence of Buddhism ( PDF 8 pages )
From an interesting public talk by Lama Lodro.
Buddhism
Known as the "Middle Way", Buddhism is a compassionate and practical spiritual science that works sensibly with human nature to achieve vast human potential, here in this life and in this world.
Buddhism is not based on ideas about God, and Buddhists are free to make their own choices about God.
Buddhism is based on the insights and teachings of Siddhartha Gautama   (see "Buddha" above). The focus of Buddhism is a humane and human method of awakening and liberating, in this world, the pure illuminated Buddha nature within all of us.
Buddha Gautama's teaching of the "Middle Way" is a balanced path of uncommon "common sense" that avoids the two extremes of destructive self-indulgence and punishing self-mortification.
The main spiritual teachings of Buddhism are summed up in Buddha Siddhartha Gautama's Four Noble Truths and his path to inner freedom, the Noble Eightfold Path.

Download Great Info (clear, easy, straightforward) about Buddhism :
Noble Truths & Illumination - Jewel Essence of Buddhism ( PDF 8 pages )
From an interesting public talk by Lama Lodro.
Chenrezig   (Avalokiteśvara, Guānyīn, Kwan Yin, Kannon) see also “Tantric Deity Motif”
Chenrezig represents our own potential for wise compassion, inner freedom, liberation from the cycles of destructive karmic compulsion, and the ultimate awakening of our inner Buddha nature that closes the gates to blind and mandatory rebirth in the six realms of Samsaric suffering.
Chenrezig meditation work helps develop and strengthen insight, right view, and right action. Chenrezig meditations help release obscurations, obstructions, and obstacles that restrict clarity, equanimity, courage, and joy.
Chenrezig's symbols are a crystal mala rosary and a white lotus.
Go to:Sadhana Texts for the text for Lama Lodro's Chenrezig Wongkur ceremony.
Go to:Images for Shrines and Wongkurs for a high-quality, iconographically correct image of Chenrezig.
Dana   (Dāna, Daan, Generosity, Giving, a form of Alms)
On a basic level, Dana is a voluntary gift of personal generosity. Dana provides a tangible form of appreciation for Dharma teachings and is a flexible way to support those Dharma teachers, such as Lama Lodro, who do not charge set fees for their part in teaching events. In this age, money is the most practical form of Dana, and the Dharma Centre of Canada suggests: "If you are unsure how much is appropriate to offer the teacher, a suggestion is roughly the amount you earn in one hour for each hour of teachings."

"In Hinduism and Buddhism, [Dana] is the practice of cultivating generosity. ... Dāna as a formal religious act is directed specifically to a monastic or spiritually-developed person. ... Buddhists believe that giving without seeking anything in return leads to greater spiritual wealth. Moreover, it reduces the acquisitive impulses that ultimately lead to continued suffering from egoism." (These details from a longer, and accurate, article in Wikipedia)

Further comments about Dana by Chrys Antaya:  The study and sharing of specialized Dharma teachings by dedicated individuals often requires a profound commitment of their time, energy, and resources. In some cases, it involves personal sacrifice when people give away their money and possessions, take vows of poverty and chastity, and study spiritual teachings as a humble monk or nun in a foreign monastery. In the Orient, there is a cumulative benefit of thousands of years of Dana given by hundreds of millions of people to support the activity of spiritual teaching. Here in the West, where Buddha-Dharma is still young, most of the Western Dharma teachers do not have a vast community infrastructure supporting them. So the teaching activity of many Dharma teachers in the West relies principally upon Dana, upon the generosity and support of Dharma students and individual patrons.
Dharma   (Dhamma, That which upholds and supports)
Dharma is a vast concept, but in its simplest sense within Buddhism, Dharma is anything in a person's life that leads to spiritual freedom and the full awakening of the diamond essence of that person's inner Buddha nature.
More specifically, Buddha-Dharma, or "THE Dharma", is based on the Buddha Gautama's (see above) humane teachings which include specific methods he discovered by which people can achieve spiritual freedom, happiness, and liberation from suffering in this world.
Eightfold Path of Buddhism  (Noble Eightfold Path, 8-fold Path)
The Noble Eightfold Path ("Noble" refers to Nobility of Virture) is Gautama Buddha's remedy leading to the down-going and ending of suffering, summarized in the fourth of his Four Noble Truths (see below). The Noble Eightfold Path is a practical and humane process for using and increasing personal Wisdom, Ethical Behaviour, and Mental Cultivation. The eight aspects of the the Eightfold Path are:

Right View
Right Thought
Right Speech
Right Action
Right Livelihood
Right Effort
Right Mindfulness
Right Concentration

The Noble Eightfold Path works with human nature to cultivate the development of great human potential. It helps reduce personal suffering in this lifetime and can ultimately help you achieve the complete unfolding of your inner Buddha nature and liberation from the blind becoming of mandatory rebirth in the cycles of suffering in Samsara.

Download Great Info (clear, easy, straightforward) about the Noble 8-fold Path : Noble Truths & Illumination - Jewel Essence of Buddhism ( PDF 8 pages )
From an interesting public talk by Lama Lodro.
Four Noble Truths of Buddhism  (4 Noble Truths, Four Truths, 4 Truths)
Gautama Buddha’s main teachings are summarized in a simple synthesis called the Four Noble Truths ("Noble" refers to Nobility of Virture), which states:

Noble Truth 1:  There is suffering.
Noble Truth 2:  There is a cause for suffering.
Noble Truth 3:  There is an end to suffering.
Noble Truth 4:  There is a path leading to the end of suffering.

The FOUR NOBLE TRUTHS are the first teachings shared by Gautama Buddha after his Enlightenment and were taught at Deer Park in Sarnath, India.

re: Noble Truth 4:  The path leading to the down-going and ending of suffering is the Noble Eightfold Path ("Noble" refers to Nobility of Virture), also known as the Eightfold Path (see "Eightfold Path of Buddhism" immediately above).

Download Great Info (clear, easy, straightforward) about the Four Noble Truths : Noble Truths & Illumination - Jewel Essence of Buddhism ( PDF 8 pages )
From an interesting public talk by Lama Lodro.
Jhana
Jhana is the foundation of insight and is one of the great spiritual medicines. It purifies consciousness and antidotes the three root poisons of ignorance, greed, and hatred. The purpose of Jhana is for "happy abiding here and now".
Manjusri   (Manjughosa, Wénshū) see also “Tantric Deity Motif”
Manjusri represents our potential to achieve pure transcendent wisdom, clarity, and inner freedom.
Manjusri is considered to be an emanation of Buddha Sakyamuni and has many aspects and attributes. Some of Manjusri's titles are: “Divine Architect”, “Gentle Glory”, “Beautiful Radiance”, and “Lord of Speech”.
Manjusri meditation cultivates mental clarity and good judgment, develops intelligence, improves memory, and opens gateways to new knowledge.
All aspects of Manjusri are believed to improve all areas of comprehension and personal communication, including articulation, literation, eloquence, persuasion, composition, translation, creative expression — and most importantly — improve the ability to identify, understand, and share the Dharma — the teachings that help us to enlightment and spiritual liberation.
Manjusri's main symbols are the flaming Wisdom Sword and the Book of Wisdom (the Prajñāpāramitā “Perfection of Wisdom” Sūttra). Manjusri’s Wisdom Sword is a symbol of clear and perceptive discernment that cuts skillfully and precisely through confusion and vanquishes ignorance. His Wisdom Book represents the attainment of ultimate wisdom and illumination.
Go to:Sadhana Texts for the text for Lama Lodro's White Manjusri Wongkur ceremony.
Go to: Images for Shrines and Wongkurs for a high-quality, iconographically correct image of White Manjusri.
Medicine Buddha   (Menla Medicine Buddha) see also “Tantric Deity Motif”
The Medicine Buddha represents our own potential for transformative healing and the achievement of vibrant good health in every aspect of our being.
Medicine Buddha meditation work is a powerful tool to assist healing and helps restore a whole, undamaged state of well being.
The Menla Medicine Buddha, known as the “King of Medicine” and “King of Lapis Lazuli Light”, is the greatest of eight Medicine Buddhas.
Menla is a Tibetan word for “health” and encompasses the idea that good health is the natural state of all living beings.
The immediate goal of Medicine Buddha meditations is to awaken your innate healing wisdom and help you heal illnesses of mind and body — to stimulate the healing process and help awaken the insight, discernment, and motivation to make beneficial choices and decisions which support good health, mental clarity, and longevity.
The ultimate goal is to achieve complete liberation from suffering.
Medicine Buddha's symbols are a fresh sprig of a potent healing plant and a bowl of healing nectar.
Go to:Sadhana Texts for the text for Lama Lodro's Medicine Buddha Wongkur ceremony.
Go to:Images for Shrines and Wongkurs for a high-quality, iconographically correct image of Medicine Buddha.
Medicine Qi Gong   (Energy Attainment)
Life Energy Cultivation exercises developed in the Traditional Chinese Medicine system (TCM) for cleansing, strengthening, and nourishing the energy body and the major organs of the physical body. Medicine Qi Gong uses gentle physical movements, visualizations, sound, and focused breathing. All the exercises in Medicine Qi Gong can be done either standing, sitting in a chair, or reclining.
Nirvana   (“Nibbana” in Pali)
Nirvana means "peace" and is called "The Great Bliss". It isn't a place somewhere else, like heaven above. It is an inner condition you can develop yourself and achieve here in this lifetime. Nirvana is a full awakening of the diamond Buddha nature within you, a state of inner illumination and profound spiritual liberation that is permanently free from suffering, free from delusion, and free from the blind becoming of mandatory rebirth in the realms of Samsaric suffering.
Peaceful Wongkur
See details at Peaceful Wongkurs in section on Wongkurs.
Red Tara   (Red Arya Tara, Dolma Karmo) see also “Tantric Deity Motif”
Red Arya Tara is a dynamic wisdom aspect of Tara which stimulates clarity, insight, wisdom, courage, strength, bliss, healthy exploration, and overcomes spiritual obstacles.
Red Tara meditation work helps penetrate into the true nature of ourselves, the world, and the universe. Tara is a complex, powerful, and multi-faceted female aspect of Buddha-nature and represents the integration of wisdom, insight, awareness, skill, and right action. Each of the many facets of Tara work in different ways to activate and liberate our inner Buddha natures. All aspects of Tara promote improved health and longevity.
Red Arya Tara's symbols are a bow and arrow made of flowers and a vase of healing nectar.
Go to:Sadhana Texts for the text for Lama Lodro's Red Tara Wongkur ceremony.
Go to:Images for Shrines and Wongkurs for a high-quality, iconographically correct image of Red Arya Tara.
Sahaja-Tantra
Sahaja-Tantra, which is Lama Lodro's main form of teaching, is an easy, natural, and spontaneous weaving together of many teachings. It is a refreshing and fluid path that integrates the mystical with the practical in harmony with the full potential of human nature. The goal is to interweave the sublime into mundane reality in a natural, uplifting, useful, and sensible way. Sahaja is a Sanskrit word meaning: spontaneous, natural, simple, or easy.
Quote from Mahendranath: “[We are] born with an instinct for naturalness. [We have] never forgotten the days of primordial perfection, except insomuch as the memory became buried under the artificial superstructure of civilization and its artificial concepts. The tree grows according to Sahaja, natural and spontaneous in complete conformity with the Natural Law of the Universe.”
Samatha-Vipassana Tranquility and Insight
An uplifting fusion of two classic forms of mental cultivation integrating the powerful insight techniques of Vipassana with calming Samatha meditations. Together they support deeper insight, cultivate transformative attainments, and nurture a state of well being and happiness that is accessible and repeatable.
Samsara
Very pithy summary of Samsara from Wikapedia: "Within Buddhism, samsara is defined as the continual repetitive cycle of birth, death, and bardo that arises from ordinary beings' grasping and fixating on a self and experiences. Samsara arises out of ignorance (avidya) and is characterized by dukkha (suffering, anxiety, dissatisfaction). In the Buddhist view, liberation from samsara is possible by following the Buddhist path."

That Buddhist path to spiritual liberation is specifically the Buddha Siddhartha Gautama's Noble Eightfold Path.
Satipatthana Sutta   (the Four Foundations of Mindfulness)
A series of exercises in mental cultivation crafted to increase awareness and lead to Vipassana insight. According to the Buddha, the practice of Satipatthana, and the subsequent experiences of Vipassana, form the only direct path to the attainment of purity, to the overcoming of sorrow and lamentation, to the end of pain and grief, to the entering of the correct path, and to the realization of the Great Bliss known as Nibbana (Nirvana).
Six Yogas of Naropa
An advanced and challenging Indo-Tibetan Buddhist Tantric body of study that can lead to very fast progress in inner liberation.
The Six Yogas of Naropa are: Mystic Heat Yoga, Illusory Body Yoga, Clear Light Yoga, Dream Yoga, Bardo Yoga, and Transference of Consciousness Yoga. They are a series, and each builds on the previous work.
Naropa (1016–1100 CE), a renowned scholar, Dharma teacher, and Mahasiddhi from a high Brahmin family in India, did not create the Six Yogas which were originally separate teachings from different sources. Rather, Naropa collected and studied the Six Yogas and is reputed to have mastered them all. Naropa then shared the Six Yogas with his students. The adventurous Tibetan scholar and Dharma teacher, Marpa the Translater (1012–1097 CE), travelled to India during his studies of the Dharma and brought home the Six Yogas which became popular with the meditation adepts of Tibet.
Tantric Deity Motif   (Meditation Deity, Celestial Wisdom Being, Deity-Yidam)
Buddhist version: Buddhist Tantric deity motifs are like spiritual avatars our ourselves and represent our own capacity for transcendent consciousness, spiritual awakening, and illumination. Each deity motif features different facets of elevated potential inherent within every person. Every aspect of posture and adornment in their images is a mystical symbol with spiritual meaning.
The classic Buddhist meditation techniques using Deity Motifs are carefully crafted formulations of Cognitive Specific Imagry and Motivational General Mastery that help individuals reprogram their conditioning and reformulate their attitudes and behaviours.
Individual Tantric deity motifs are depicted as either male or female, but they are all of benefit to women and men. Examples are: Chrenrizig, Manjusri, Medicine Buddha, Red Tara, Vajra Sattva, Vajra Yogini, and White Tara of Long Life.

Peaceful Deity Motifs  (Meditation Deity, Celestial Wisdom Being, Deity-Yidam) feature serene and powerful avatars which represent our potential for inner strength, health, clarity, wisdom, harmony, equilibrium, and right action. Peaceful Deity Motifs represent energy that is uplifting, illuminating, healing, pacifying, and which helps tame inner turbulance.
Peaceful Wongkurs each have a Peaceful Deity Motif with a specific focus and can help counteract fear, anxiety, phobias, injury, trauma, and can help antidote the root poisons of hatred-anger-aversion and ignorance-delusion.
Peaceful Deity Motifs are most often portrayed as sitting in graceful and elegant postures upon moon disks resting on large lotuses. The lotus represents our true Buddha nature liberated from the delusions and suffering of samsara. The moon disk represents the balanced energy of enlightened compassion. Occasionally, Peaceful Deities are poised on sun disks which represent the energetic activity of enlightened wisdom.
Examples of Peaceful deity motifs are: Chrenrizig, Manjusri, Medicine Buddha, Red Tara, Vajra Sattva, and White Tara of Long Life.

Wrathful Deity Motifs  (Meditation Deity, Celestial Wisdom Being, Deity-Yidam) feature dynamic and powerful avatars which represent the activation and constructive use of our own fiery energy of action, discernment, and purification that identifies and solves problems, penetrates through illusion and delusion, removes obstacles, clears away obscurations, guards, and protects.
Wrathful Deity Motifs are emphatic, unambiguous, assertive, and unhesitatingly trample obstacles and cut through inner obscurations.
Wrathful Wongkurs each have a Wrathful Deity Motif with a specific focus and can help counteract fear, confusion, distraction, uncertainty, inertia, oppression, restriction, persecution, and can also help antidote the root poisons of greed-clinging-attachment and ignorance-delusion.
Wrathful Deity Motifs are most often portrayed as standing in dynamic postures on sun disks resting on large lotuses. The lotus represents our true Buddha nature liberated from the delusions and suffering of samsara. The sun disk represents the energetic activity of enlightened wisdom. Occasionally, Wrathful and Semi-wrathful Deities are poised on moon disks which represents the balanced energy of enlightened compassion.
Examples of Wrathful Deity Motifs are: Hayagriva, Hevajra, Vajrapani, and Vajra Yogini.

See also “Wongkur” re: Empowerment Initiation ceremonies featuring Tantric deity motifs.
Vajra Sattva   (also Vajrasattva) see also “Tantric Deity Motif”
Venerable Namgyal Rinpoche said Vajra Sattva is the most important and the most powerfully transformative of all wongkur initiations.
Vajra Sattva represents the pure diamond essence of our inner Buddha nature and our potential for renewal, illumination, and transcendence. Vajra Sattva meditation work helps cultivate and integrate wisdom, clarity, and skill to accelerate spiritual awakening. Vajra Sattva meditation helps purify outer and inner aspects of body, speech, mind, motivation, intention, action, and karma.
The immediate goal is to dispel the three root poisons of ignorance-delusion, greed-craving-attachment, and hatred-aversion and thereby remove obstructive habitual patterns, emotional delusions, and negative karmic accumulations. The ultimate goal of Vajra Sattva meditations is to achieve inner freedom and complete liberation from suffering. Vajra Sattva's symbols are a ceremonial hand-held Bell and Vajra wand (Dorje).
Go to:Sadhana Texts for the text for Lama Lodro's Vajra Sattva Wongkur ceremony.
Vajra Yogini   (Dorje Phagmo, Vajra-Varahi, Naljorma, Dorje Naljorma)
see also “Tantric Deity Motif”
Vajra Yogini is an embodiment of inner fire (Tibetan: Tummo) and is one of the highest Yoga Tantric Yidhams. Vajra Yogini meditation practice contacts and integrates depth consciousness, balances the psyche, reintegrates the being, cuts through delusions and obstacles, triumphs over ignorance, and leads to the clear light of bliss.
Quote from Venerable Namgyal Rinpoche: "The radiant Vajra Yogini is a personification of Spirit, of vibrational energy, and the Intellect of Bodhi. Her sadhana awakens the power of the mind and helps direct it. Energy becomes available to be put into use by the awakened intellect."
Vajra Yogini's symbols are a curved, hooked knife which represents the mind's power of discrimination and a skull cup that represents renunciation and passing beyond material clinging.
Go to:Sadhana Texts for the text for Lama Lodro's Vajra Yogini Level One Wongkur ceremony.
Vipassana
Vipassana, also commonly known as "Insight Meditation", is the goal of the Satipatthãna method of mental cultivation. Vipassana means to achieve spontaneous insight into the truth of impermanence, suffering, and the insubstantial nature of all phenomena.
Vipassana meditation develops mindfulness (continuity of observation) and awareness (penetrating into the meaning of what is observed). The true nature of being thus revealed, which leads to purification, liberation, and inner freedom. Vipassana is one of the most popular groups of mental cultivation and meditation in Theravada Buddhism.

Vipassana has many different types of tools of mental cultivation and meditation exercises. Examples are "Metta" and "Thirty-two Parts of the Body", plus the "Awareness Walk" in Lama Lodro's handout on "Walking Meditations". All of which can be found above at Tools of Mental Cultivation used by Lama Lodro.
Visuddhi Magga   (the Path of Purification)
A tool kit of 40 classic fundamental fields of mental cultivation. Different tools of mental cultivation work better at different times for each meditator. Guidance through the options in the Visuddhi Magga helps you find out which tools of mental cultivation work best for you here and now, and which could be helpful in the future depending on which direction your meditation practice evolves.
White Tara of Long Life   (Ãrya Tarã, Sita Tarã, Jetsun Dolma)
see also “Tantric Deity Motif”
White Tara of Long Life encompasses every level of health and healing and represents our own potential to live in good health, attain our maximum vitality and longevity, gain clear wisdom, purify negative karma, and be happy.
Fondly called “She Who Saves”, Tara is a powerful, multi-faceted, and complex female aspect of Buddha-nature. White Tara of Long Life is one of many different forms of Tara, which all assist in diverse ways on the myriad paths to awakening and liberation of our inner Buddha natures.
White Tara meditation can help focus, clarify, and strengthen your intention and capacity for healing. The initial goals of White Tara of Long Life meditations are the healing and repair of body, mind, attitude, energy fields, and karma. The ultimate goal is inner freedom and complete liberation from suffering.
White Tara of Long Life's symbols are a white eight-spoked Wisdom Wheel, a vase of long-life healing nectar, and a fresh branch with three blue uptala flowers (one in bud, one in full bloom, and one faded and turning to seed). The stages of the three blossoms represent past, present, and future and are also a short-hand for the Cycle of Interdependent Origination. White Tara's vase of long-life healing nectar is not seen because it is tucked into the blue uptala blossom in full bloom.
Go to:Sadhana Texts for Lama Lodro's White Tara of Long Life Wongkur ceremony.
Go to:Images for Shrines and Wongkurs for a high-quality, iconographically correct image of White Tara of Long Life.
Wongkur   (Wong, Empowerment, Entrustment, Initiation)
A mystical Tibetan Buddhist ceremony conducted by a Lama.  The Lama uses energy transmission, ritual, mantra, symbolic gesture, and symbolic objects to create an esoteric experience that encapsulates the arc and energy of spiritual unfolding.
Each wongkur usually features one of the Buddhist Tantric deity motifs, which are symbols of different forms of transcendent consciousness that is potential within all of us.
The carefully crafted synergy of a wongkur provides a spiritual catalyst which resonates in the depths of the psyche. The effects can continue to reverberate within the practitioner long after the ceremony.

NOTE: Formal meditation training is not required to participate in Lama Lodro’s wongkurs.  Lama Lodro uses as much English as possible during his wongkurs and strives to make them comprehensible to the participants, including novices with no background in this type of ceremony.

See also “Tantric Deity Motif”

Peaceful Wongkurs feature serene Deity Motif avatars which represent our potential for inner strength, health, clarity, wisdom, harmony, equilibrium, and right action.
Peaceful Deity Motifs represent energy that is uplifting, illuminating, healing, pacifying, and which helps tame inner turbulance. Peaceful Wongkurs each have a specific focus and can help counteract fear, anxiety, phobias, injury, trauma, and can help antidote the root poisons of hatred-anger-aversion and ignorance-delusion.

Wrathful Wongkurs feature fierce Deity Motif avatars which represent the activation and constructive use of our own fiery energy of action, discernment, and purification that identifies and solves problems, removes obstacles, clears away obscurations, guards, and protects.
Wrathful Deity Motifs are dynamic, emphatic, unambiguous, and work more assertively to unhesitatingly trample obstacles and cut through inner obscurations. Wrathful Wongkurs each have a specific focus and can help counteract fear, confusion, distraction, uncertainty, inertia, oppression, restriction, persecution, and can also help antidote the root poisons of greed-clinging-attachment and ignorance-delusion.

Go to: Sadhana (Texts) for Wongkur Ceremonies for the texts for Lama Lodro's Wongkur ceremonies.
Yidam   (Perfected Being, Radiant Body)
{1}. Yidam = Radiant body of Perfected Being. Includes all the peaceful, wrathful, and semi-wrathful Tantric Deity Motifs (Meditation Deities, Celestial Wisdom Beings, Deity-Yidams).   See also “Tantric Deity Motif”
{2}. Personal Yidam = a personal Meditation Deity identified (usually by a knowledgeable Lama) as a specific focus of meditation for an individual. Personal Yidams have an inspiring tutelary aspect and are a valuable contemplative aid. It is believed the specific type of enlightened Buddha-nature energy associated with a personal Yidam will provide spiritual balance, accelerate meditation progress, and smooth the path to personal liberation. An introduction and instruction in the meditations specific to any Yidam are often conferred by a Lama in a Wongkur ceremony.
NOTE: A personal Yidam is different from the "emanation" of spiritual energy manifesting within and through a person. For example, the late Venerable Namgyal Rinpoche was considered to be an emanation of White Manjushri, and his Yidam was Vajra Yogini. He explained that this means Vajra Yogini was part of his private meditations, but his outward activity "emanating" in the world was expressed through the energy and attributes associated with Manjushri.

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